11075 West Coggins Drive, Sun City, AZ, 85351

11075 West Coggins Drive, Sun City, AZ, 85351

11075 West Coggins Drive, Sun City, AZ, 85351

 1 Bed | 1 Bath | 929 Sq. Ft. | UNDER CONTRACT

 Great find in Sun City, AZ 85351

 SUN CITY VALUE | Clean, move-in ready one bed, one bath unit. These homes feel bigger than they look! Spacious, eat-in kitchen * Family Room & Dining Room * Separate Laundry * Refrigerator, Washer & Dryer, included! Fantastic bonus Arizona Room * One-car garage with attached cabinets * Just off Grand Avenue, and very accessible to all Sun City has to offer * Minutes from Loop 101, Stadiums, Entertainment, Healthcare & MORE!

 Call for a private showing

Call for more information:  (602) 616-1455

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Coming Soon: 5625 W. Aster, Glendale, AZ 85304

Coming Soon: 5625 W. Aster, Glendale, AZ 85304

5625 W. Aster, Glendale, AZ 85304

Status: Active

4 Beds | 2 Bath | 2,145 Sq. Ft. | Offered at $350,000

A Great Find in Glendale, AZ 85304 

Very few homes go For Sale in this neighborhood and even fewer single level – Capistrano Models. Located in Marshall Ranch, this 4 Bedroom, 2 Bath home features a 3-car garage and a pool! A spacious 2145 sq. ft – single level home with new renovations. Comes with a fireplace, North-South Exposure, and a raised garden. A steal for $350k!

Call for a private showing

Call for more information:  (602) 616-1455

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HOW WILL COVID-19 AFFECT THE MARKET?

HOW WILL COVID-19 AFFECT THE MARKET?

March 18 

A number of people seem to assume that we are heading for a recession and that home prices will fall. The first assumption is quite reasonable. The second assumption is based on fear and has little analytical data to back it up. Obviously anything can happen in an uncertain and disrupted world, but a fall in home prices is still looking very unlikely from today’s numbers.

In 2005 the housing industry started to sicken because homes were being used as speculative commodities not for places to live. In 2005 I met a man in his early 20s who owned 12 homes in the Phoenix area, all with no occupants. How had he been able to buy them? 100% loans from unscrupulous lenders who went bust between 2007 and 2010. The housing industry (and more particularly the lending industry within it) was the cause of the 2008 recession. Phoenix was a hot spot for the cause of the problem, as was Las Vegas.

In 2020, housing is an innocent bystander to a probable recession caused by a pandemic. It has supply at extremely low levels and most homeowners have a large amount of equity. Even if they lost all their income and could no longer pay their mortgage, they could quickly find a buyer to release that equity. There is little likelihood of them facing foreclosure because the lender can be paid off with the sale proceeds. Only when demand collapses do the banks have to foreclose to get their money back. At the moment demand is still well above normal and has only shown very tiny signs of easing. In 2006 demand fell off a cliff yet home builders continued to build even more new homes because lenders continued to write ill-advised loans in huge numbers.

In 2020 builders are probably going to have to build fewer homes than they wish because of shortages of labor and materials. We are unlikely to see a glut of homes on the market for a very long time. A successful vaccine for the novel corona virus is more likely to appear before a surplus of homes could possibly develop.

Because the virus has not been contained yet, except in several parts of Southeast Asia, we are likely to see a lot of people out of work. We do not yet know how long it will take to get control of the pandemic in Arizona, but many people may be out of work for quite some time. These people are more likely to be renters rather than homeowners. Landlords may find it much harder to collect rents and the yields from their portfolios are likely to fall. Some may decide to evict tenants and sell their properties. At the moment the extra supply would be welcomed and receive multiple offers, even in these troubled times. The evicted tenants still exist and therefore still represent demand for shelter of some sort. There will be hardship, but not a flood of homes with no-one to live in them.

Housing demand is created by the existence of people and increases when more people turn up and decreases if they go away. In 2005 the people we were building new homes for were largely imaginary. In 2020 they are very real and migration trends have been very favorable with families and individuals moving to Arizona from other parts of the USA.

All the indicators for the Central Arizona housing market remain very healthy at the moment and we will report any change as soon as we spot one. There is no cause for panic and if you are delaying a purchase because you think the price will come down, you are probably making a poor decision.

3 ways to stay safe and sane at home during the Corona Virus outbreak

3 ways to stay safe and sane at home during the Corona Virus outbreak

1. Organize and clean up your workspace

Many American’s and people around the world are working from home for the foreseeable future. This means a change in your normal work environment and struggling with a lack of creativity or motivation or both. By creating a comfortable, clean and easy to navigate workspace at home you will be more motivated to put in an effective workday even if you’re in your PJs.

* Find a space in your home that is comfortable and has plenty of natural light. Natural light has been proven to lighten anxiety and ease stress.

* Make sure to clean and disinfect all surfaces and de-clutter your space.

* Make sure that your space is one of the quieter ones around the house.

* Last but not least, make sure you have easy access to all of your technology and devices to spend less time working on technical issues later.

2. Don’t Stress and Scream, Rest and Stream

There are a few good streaming service deals out there to take advantage of while we spending much more time at home during our practice of social distancing.

Netflix:  30-day free trial period. After that, it’s $9-16/mo.

Hulu:  30-day free trial for basic access (with ads) and a 7-day free trial without ads $6-12/mo.

Disney+:  The usual rate of a 7-day free trial period. After, it’s $7/mo. Plus, subscribers get access to National Geographic, Marvel, Pixar, and other Star Wars content.

Sling TV:  Sling is thousands of hours of free programming temporarily because of coronavirus. Viewers can access different news programs like ABC News Live to stay informed about the pandemic as well as entertainment for kids.

3. Home School is Better than No School

With the kids staying home during an unexpectedly long Spring break they are going to be laying around the house more than ever before. Use this as an opportunity to have the kids open those relics we call books and soak up some knowledge. Here are 3 fun ways to start a homeschool curriculum in your home.

  • Assign a block of time that you and your child will dedicate to lesson time.

  • Keep it fun:  Find interesting Youtube videos on history subjects that your child is interested in and have them write you a short report on the video. They have videos on “How Photo Synthesis works in plants to the History of the Roman empire.

Tons of engaging and fun learning videos

 

  • Do Some Weird Science

At home DIY science experiments are a great way for kids to learn the scientific method. Here are some ideas that are fun but full of learning.

8 Simply Awesome Science Experiments that you can do at home

From our family to yours. Stay safe, be vigilant and God bless. The Angelo Group

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